Book 151: An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth by Chris Hadfield

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An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth by Chris Hadfield

Finished reading on September 15th, 2014

Rating: 8/10

Why would someone want to prepare for all possible worst-case scenarios and why would someone aim to be a zero?

Those are some of the questions the reader gets an answer to in this one-of-a kind book.

I went into this book with a sort of prejudice knowing that it’s not exactly a biography – it didn’t make me too excited about it although I’m a big fan of just about anything to do with space exploration and science and astronautics.

However I should have known better from all the Youtube videos of Chris Hadfield I’ve seen – it couldn’t possibly have been as boring as I thought it might be. It’s probably the “Guide to Life on Earth” part that made me unsure of whether or not I should read it thinking that there must be something better to read….

But my fears weren’t justified. The book is good – entertaining, logical and exciting and it shows how some of the ways that astronauts train or live would in fact make a lot of sense even on Earth and maybe shouldn’t be only reserved for very expensive space travel…

It was curious as it showed astronauts’ life from a different angle than biographies would, and it seemed more intimate and a more in-depth look into the astronaut mind-set even.

Although in the first place I disliked the idea of it being “a guide”, I think in the end I took a liking to it, as the advice seems relevant – for example aiming to be a zero, rather than a plus one and certainly not minus one – plus one meaning you’re a person who’d make a situation better and would be of help in case it’s necessary, minus one being someone who’d make the situation worse and zero being neutral – not making anything worse nor better. I found it interesting as I’d never thought of that option, I guess for me it seems more as if in a given situation I’m either making the situation worse or better, but couldn’t possibly not affect it.

So in general – quite excellent and well thought out, I’d especially recommend reading it to people who are normally not into space-y stuff, but this book might help them get interested in it. 😉

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Book 150: A Case Of Exploding Mangoes by Mohammed Hanif

A Case Of Exploding Mangoes by Mohammed Hanif

Finished reading on september 7th, 2014

Rating: 8/10

This book starts with a planecrash. And I started reading it in the beginning of a two week vacation in July on a plane. So it was quite appropriate, although when my boyfriend asked me what the book was about, he did get a little nervous when I mentioned an airplane crashing (he thought that explosion and plane crash aren’t appropriate vocabulary on a flight).

The story takes place in Pakistan and follows some months in the lives of several people between whom you wouldn’t think are connections, but even the beginning lets you know that somehow the connections are made.

One of the people is Ali Shigri, who is in the army and a silent drill instructor, whose life takes quite interesting turns when his roommate Obaid disappears.

Another character in the book is General Zia ul-Haq, a dictator, whose too scared to leave his house as he doesn’t know (and the secret service doesn’t know either) who is planning to kill him.

The exciting part is that you find out in the beginning that the dictator dies in the plane crash and Shigri has something to do with it, and all that the reader has to do is find out what exactly happened and why.

And believe me, it’s all quite dark and in some rare parts oddly funny, and although the end seems clear, as it’s in the beginning, the solution came as a surprise, not with a twist but there were some unexpected components.