Book 227: Walden by Henry David Thoreau

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Walden by Henry David Thoreau

Finished reading on September 4th, 2016

Rating: 6/10

I love the idea of a simple life by a pond in a forest in a tiny little house with no other responsibilities than finding food and water and keeping warm. And because I like this idea so much, I picked up “Walden” for the third time in my life.

First time was almost exactly ten years ago, when I was 16, then I read an abridged edition; when I finally realized that it was shorter (and had finished reading it), I picked up an unabridged version and hated the tone of voice that my imagination gave to the extremely patronizing Thoreau in the first 20-30 pages, and it was one of very few books that I had started to read, and hated it from the start and couldn’t keep on reading, because I wholly disagreed with the author.

Now, being closer to Thoreau’s age when he spent time by Walden Pond, I got through the (still disturbingly patronizing sounding) first part, and actually enjoyed some of the later parts, taking pleasure in particular in the part where Thoreau describes sounding the Pond to find out how deep the pond is, and where the deepest part is.

Also another intriguing part in my view was about the colour of water and ice of the ponds in different conditions – so in general I found his observations and detailed descriptions of nature very enjoyable.

I am quite proud of myself for giving Thoreau another try, but I felt like I was having an argument with a highly stubborn older brother, who is a minimalist and can not be persuaded to see a different side of the question (for example in the case of eating meat…), but also has a lot of random bits of information tucked away that he’d randomly take out during a conversation, and talk about classic mythology, or constellations and stars or names of plants etc.

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Book 226: Rise of the Rocket Girls by Nathalia Holt

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Rise of the Rocket Girls by Nathalia Holt

Finished reading on September 3rd, 2016

Rating: 8/10

Women with a love of mathematics at Jet Propulsion Lab from 1940s to more recent times.
Nathalia Holt looks into the lives and work of the human “computers” at JPL, who did the calculations for the rocket launches and space missions that JPL was doing.

The book was quite fascinating, as first off you get an idea of how difficult it was for women to find a job where they could actually use their talent for mathematics, and when they did find one, how it was highly unlikely to get back to work (in the same area) after starting a family, and how those who did succeed in that, had difficulties with managing life at two fronts.

I think that “Rise of the Rocket Girls” was an excellent book – it is somewhat inspirational, it shows women using their brains and you also get a bit of a timeline in some space missions.

Although I very much enjoyed reading it, I’m not giving it 10/10 because I felt that the beginning of the book goes into much more detail into the actual contents of the computers’ work, whilst later on,  you get an idea what project they were working on, but not so much what part exactly they had in it.

Despite that, I’d recommend this book to everyone.