Book 235: Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg

Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead by Sheryl Sandberg

Finished reading on October 27th, 2017
Rating: 9/10

Why is it that a lot of women with higher education after some years don’t work or haven’t advanced in their careers as much as men with the same education? Why don’t men opt for being work-at-home fathers as often as women make the choice to stay at home with their children? Why shouldn’t one ask how to “have it all”?

This is another one of those books that I wouldn’t normally read, just because the content seems logical anyway, so why spend the time reading it? It’s still how I  feel, that’s why I only rated it with 9 points out of 10.

However I did find some points in it interesting. And I do feel that high-school and undergraduate students should read it, so that more women would stay in the workforce and also so that men would also see more options….

There’s a lot of good advice. For example to make your partner a real partner – don’t just do all the chores yourself, but share them and don’t require the other person to do them your way, but rather their own way, even if you consider it wrong.

Another one would be to not judge people on their choices when it comes to career and family – it might seem as if everyone has the same choices but in reality that might not be the case.

An interesting point Sandberg made in the book is that a man and a woman with the same skill-sets would be perceived differently and that there are different expectations to women in professional situations, and not just from men, but from women as well – you’d expect a woman to be nicer in any given situation than a man with the same kind of job. But at the same time successful women are seen as less nice and not liked as much as successful men.

While reading this book, I had one successful woman in the back of my mind, whose decisions have influenced me a lot and that probably is the reason why I felt that Sandberg’s book is just purely logical, and there’s not much new to me information in there. And I consider it obvious that it isn’t  “a woman’s” job to cook and clean – the person who can and wants to do those things will, but there’re no expectations for any one person to do it.

Another interesting thing was the part about mentors – asking someone to mentor you, or having a mentor without even realizing it. I think the main point there was to not ask someone to mentor you in those words, ask for specific advice rather than “be my mentor” – a sneaky way to get a mentor without the mentor even realizing it :).

I’m glad that I read it, and I think that everyone might benefit from reading it – to lean in to what ever it is you want to do with your life, be more confident and reach for the opportunities even when you don’t feel particularly ready for them.

 

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